80srecordparty:

Newsweek, January 23, 1984

80srecordparty:

Newsweek, January 23, 1984

Reblogged from bohemea with 401 notes

nwkarchivist:

As Tatum O’Neal pens our current “My Turn” column reflecting on childhood memories honoring recently deceased agent Sue Mengers, it seemed an opportune  time to unearth this fascinating cover story of the then 12-year old from February 9, 1976.

…My relationship with my dad is extremely precious.  Nobody in the world has a relationship like that.  Me and my dad- it has nothing to do with sex.  It’s not perverse.  Some people think like that because we’re too close.  People are weird…

nwkarchivist:

As Tatum O’Neal pens our current “My Turn” column reflecting on childhood memories honoring recently deceased agent Sue Mengers, it seemed an opportune  time to unearth this fascinating cover story of the then 12-year old from February 9, 1976.

…My relationship with my dad is extremely precious.  Nobody in the world has a relationship like that.  Me and my dad- it has nothing to do with sex.  It’s not perverse.  Some people think like that because we’re too close.  People are weird…

Reblogged from nwkarchivist with 46 notes

cheatsheet:

newsweek:

nwkarchivist:

Welcome to the colorful world of the Newsweek Archivist.  Hope you enjoy as much as we do! 

INTRODUCING… the latest from the Newsbeast Tumblr camp, and our fabulous research team: NEWSWEEK ARCHIVIST. Your daily dose of Newsweek archive gems.

We <3 archives.

Fuck Yeah Newsweek Archives has morphed into the less profane NWK Archivist, upon which Fuck Yeah Newsweek Archives will be advising. Looking forward!

Reblogged from cheatsheet with 811 notes

"The types of computers we have today are tools. They’re responders: you ask a computer to do something and it will do it. The next stage is going to be computers as “agents.” In other words, it will be as if there’s a little person inside that box who starts to anticipate what you want. Rather than help you, it will start to guide you through large amounts of information. It will almost be like you have a little friend inside that box."

One of many amazing quotes in this 3,500-word NEWSWEEK interview with Steve Jobs, which appeared in a 1984 special issue of the magazine. Jobs was 29 at the time.

Reblogged from newsweek with 131 notes

"iPod Nation," NEWSWEEK, July 26, 2004.

"From early on we wanted a product that would seem so natural and so inevitable and so simple you almost wouldn&#8217;t think of it as having been designed," says Apple&#8217;s industrial designer. This austerity extended to the whiteness of the iPod, a double-crystal polymer Antarctica, a blankness that screams in brilliant colors across a crowded subway. "It&#8217;s neutral, but it is a bold neutral, just shockingly neutral," says Ive.
Assessing the final product, Jobs bestows, for him, the ultimate accolade: &#8220;It&#8217;s as Apple as anything Apple has ever done.&#8221;

[link]

"iPod Nation," NEWSWEEK, July 26, 2004.

"From early on we wanted a product that would seem so natural and so inevitable and so simple you almost wouldn’t think of it as having been designed," says Apple’s industrial designer. This austerity extended to the whiteness of the iPod, a double-crystal polymer Antarctica, a blankness that screams in brilliant colors across a crowded subway. "It’s neutral, but it is a bold neutral, just shockingly neutral," says Ive.

Assessing the final product, Jobs bestows, for him, the ultimate accolade: “It’s as Apple as anything Apple has ever done.”

[link]

"Rebirth of the Blues," May 26, 1969
R.I.P. Janis, who died 41 years ago today.

"Rebirth of the Blues," May 26, 1969

R.I.P. Janis, who died 41 years ago today.

newsweek:

As our resident archivist notes, our November 1965 cover on protesters in New York City is an interesting forbearer of big things to come. Who are these protesters!? Why are they here?! At the time, one could pay 35 cents to read and find out. Now, all you need is a hashtag.

newsweek:

As our resident archivist notes, our November 1965 cover on protesters in New York City is an interesting forbearer of big things to come. Who are these protesters!? Why are they here?! At the time, one could pay 35 cents to read and find out. Now, all you need is a hashtag.

Reblogged from newsweek with 111 notes


Today in Newsweek archives: Girls Rule!

Yesterday’s dramatic penalty shootout win over Brazil in the semifinals of the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup marked the 12th anniversary of this iconic 1999 image, showing defender Brandi Chastain (now an ESPN commentator) just seconds after she secured the penalty for the World Cup win against China (the second win in U.S. history). At the time, international interest in women’s soccer was at an all-time high—and the celebrated match against China was the most-attended women’s sporting event in history. Chastain called it “the greatest moment of my life on the soccer field. The U.S. is set to face France on Wednesday.

Today in Newsweek archives: Girls Rule!

Yesterday’s dramatic penalty shootout win over Brazil in the semifinals of the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup marked the 12th anniversary of this iconic 1999 image, showing defender Brandi Chastain (now an ESPN commentator) just seconds after she secured the penalty for the World Cup win against China (the second win in U.S. history). At the time, international interest in women’s soccer was at an all-time high—and the celebrated match against China was the most-attended women’s sporting event in history. Chastain called it “the greatest moment of my life on the soccer field. The U.S. is set to face France on Wednesday.

Reblogged from newsweek with 187 notes

In this April 1981 Newsweek cover, the editors called the just-launched space shuttle program—which began with the Columbia—the “most spectacular sales promotion in history.” They predicted that the future in space lied with private industry—a belief mirrored by the Obama administration nearly three decades later:

Once investment in space loses its element of risk, predicts NASA’s Bekey, “industry will jump in.” If so, Columbia’s historic voyage may turn out to be not only a splendid technical and scientific achievement, but also perhaps the most spectacular sales promotion in history. Even as mankind’s great adventure in space is getting under way, it is also, in a sense, ending. Impelled by the dual human imperatives to explore—and to see if some money can be made at it—we have begun to probe the very fringes of a great uncharted sea; already, we want to know where the best fishing is.

Newsweek, 4/27/1981

In this April 1981 Newsweek cover, the editors called the just-launched space shuttle program—which began with the Columbia—the “most spectacular sales promotion in history.” They predicted that the future in space lied with private industry—a belief mirrored by the Obama administration nearly three decades later:

Once investment in space loses its element of risk, predicts NASA’s Bekey, “industry will jump in.” If so, Columbia’s historic voyage may turn out to be not only a splendid technical and scientific achievement, but also perhaps the most spectacular sales promotion in history. Even as mankind’s great adventure in space is getting under way, it is also, in a sense, ending. Impelled by the dual human imperatives to explore—and to see if some money can be made at it—we have begun to probe the very fringes of a great uncharted sea; already, we want to know where the best fishing is.

Newsweek, 4/27/1981

Reblogged from newsweek with 73 notes

June 6, 1977
Newsweek&#8217;s first cover on gay rights, featuring a fiery Anita Bryant, documented how the Florida Citrus Commission spokeswoman (and former Miss Oklahoma) was mobilizing what was described as a &#8220;somewhat bizarre but deadly serious battle over gay rights.&#8221;
Bryant, of course, would later take a banana cream pie in the face. (&#8220;Well at least it&#8217;s a fruit pie,&#8221; she exclaimed.)
And thirty-four years to the month later, New York would become the sixth and largest state to legalize gay marriage.

June 6, 1977

Newsweek’s first cover on gay rights, featuring a fiery Anita Bryant, documented how the Florida Citrus Commission spokeswoman (and former Miss Oklahoma) was mobilizing what was described as a “somewhat bizarre but deadly serious battle over gay rights.”

Bryant, of course, would later take a banana cream pie in the face. (“Well at least it’s a fruit pie,” she exclaimed.)

And thirty-four years to the month later, New York would become the sixth and largest state to legalize gay marriage.